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Circles Cushion crochet pattern

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Circles Cushion crochet pattern

 

Cheer up your home with lovely pastels 

 

Skills

The cushion is crocheted in the round with treble stitches (US: double crochet stitches). For this pattern you will be working: 

  • Chain stitches;
  • Slip stitches;
  • Treble stitches.

The tutorial in this pattern focuses on beginners. This project is suitable to learn to crochet in the round. 

You know how to crochet already? Then skip straight to the Quickstart Pattern!

 

Required materials:

 

Size:

The cushion will measure approx. 35 cm. in diameter.

 

CONTENTS / go straight to:

About this project

I.   QUICKSTART PATTERN

II.  THE BASICS

Chain stitches

Treble stitches

III. LET'S GET STARTED

Row 1

Row 2

Row 3

Row 4

Row 5

Row 6 and onwards

IV. FINISHING

 

About this project

A project crocheted in the round seems impressive (and it actually is, quite...), but it's not difficult. This is a nice and quick project to learn to crochet in the round.

For yarn I used MoYa's handdyed organic cotton. It's robust enough to stand daily wear and tear and yet soft to the touch. Due to the hand dyeing process there are nuances of colour in the yarn. This gives a lively, "washed-out" effect. Very much fun for a home decor project like this! 

The subtle colours combine wonderfully. For variations, you can make a stripe pattern using 2 different colours. Make one side a different colour than the other. Make several cushions in soft pastels, or combine a pastel with a matching variegated cushion (for example 1 cushion in Sand and another in Topaz). 

 

Chapter I

QUICKSTART PATTERN

Please note: When I write treble, I mean the UK treble, which is the US double crochet.

Row 1

  1. Chain 6 and close the circle with a slip stitch.
  2. Chain 2.
  3. Treble 11 into circle. Close with a slip stitch.

Row 2

  1. Chain 2.
  2. Treble 1 into the stitch directly next to the chains.
  3. Treble 2 into all other stitches: 24 in total incl the 2 chains.
  4. Close with a slip stitch.

Row 3

  1. Chain 2.
  2. Treble 1 into the stitch directly next to the chains.
  3. Treble 1, then treble 2 – repeat. End with a treble 1 into the stitch underneath the chains. 
  4. Close with a slip stitch.

Row 4

  1. Chain 2.
  2. Treble 1 into the stitch directly next to the chains.
  3. * Treble 1, treble 1, treble 2 – repeat from *. End with a treble 2 x 1. Treble the last into the stitch underneath the chains. 
  4. Close with a slip stitch.

Row 5

  1. Chain 2.
  2. Treble 1 into the stitch directly next to the chains.
  3. Treble * 3 x 11 x 2 – repeat from *. End with treble 3 x 1. Treble the last single treble into the stitch underneath the chains. 
  4. Close with a slip stitch.

Row 6 and on

  1. Chain 2.
  2. Treble 1 into the stitch directly next to the chains.
  3. Treble * 4 x 1, 1 x 2 – repeat from * End with treble 4 x 1. Treble the last single treble into the stitch underneath the chains. Close with a slip stitch.
  4. Chain 2 and treble 1 into the stich directly next to the chains. 
  5. Treble * 5 x 11 x 2 – repeat from * End with treble 5 x 1. Treble the last single treble into the stitch underneath the chains. Close with a slip stitch.
  6. And so on: with each new row, you add another 'single' treble stitch to the repeating pattern.

 

Crochet on this way, adding another 'single' treble stitch to the pattern with each new row.

Continue until you have crocheted approx. 17 rows, or until the circle fits one half of the pillow stuffing. 

Make another circle in the same way.

Sew or crochet the round patches together. When about halfway, put in the stuffing and continue. 

Weave in the last loose ends. 

 

CONGRATULATIONS! Your Circles cushion is done and ready to use!

 

Chapter II

THE BASICS

To crochet this cushion, you start with chain stitches. After that you use treble stitches. Both these stitches are very common in crochet. 

Please note: When I write treble, I mean the UK treble, which is the US double crochet.

In this Chapter you’ll find a tutorial on how to crochet these stitches. If you already know this (more or less will be good enough), you can move straight on to Chapter III. If not, you might like to practice a bit.

 

Chain stitches

A chain stitch is a simple loop. Chain stitches are used to make a start with crocheting, by quite literally making a chain of stitches. They are also used at the end of each row, to make a start for the next row.

Pleaste note! It’s important that you don’t crochet the chain too tightly. Better too loose than too tight! 

The first stitch is made the same way as with knitting:

  • Wind the yarn around two fingers and over the two fingers again to the back of the first thread, making a “cracknel” shape as shown in the image. You can also shape the yarn this way on the table in front of you.

haken eerste losse maken

 

  • Use the crochet hook to pull the back thread through the front one to form a loop:

haken eerste losse maken 2

 

  • Pull gently on the end to shape the first loop:

haken eerste losse maken 3

 

 

Hold the crochet hook in your right hand and take the yarn (on the ball end, not the loose end) in your left hand. 

  • Wrap the yarn over the hook in an anticlockwise direction Draw the yarn through to form a new loop. 

haken ketting van lossen 1

 

  • You have now made a new loop, or “chained one”. Don’t pull too tightly!

haken ketting van lossen 2

 

By repeating these steps, you make a chain of stiches. 

 

Treble stitches

Here you’ll find the basic tutorial for a treble stitch (US term: double crochet). It’s a common stitch that gets used a lot in crochet. By skipping stitches or crocheting multiple trebles into 1 stitch, various fun patterns can be created.

The treble stitch is a nice and supple stitch and ideal for lots of items, like scarves and blankets. 

This tutorial shows how the basic treble stitch, worked into a base chain. Further on (Row 1) you’ll find the tutorial on crocheting it in the round. The stitch itself is similar, so it’s up to you which tutorial you prefer – drawings or pictures. 

  • Wrap the yarn anti-clockwise over hook and insert the hook into the stitch on top of which you want the treble. For square projects, that is usually the 4th chain stitch:

treble - 1

Stick the hook underneath the little “v” shape

 

  • Wrap the yarn over the hook, draw through the chain and wrap the yarn again. Stretched out, it should look like this now: 

    stokje haken 2

     

  • Draw through the first 2 loops (most left on the image) only. Wrap the yarn again, anti-clockwise, around the hook: 

stokje haken 3

 

  • Draw through the last 2 loops on the hook. There is now only one loop left on the hook:

stokje haken 4

Chapter III

LET'S GET STARTED

You start by making a tiny circle from 6 chain stitches.

  • Chain 6, including the chain stitch on your hook:

 

  • Insert the hook into the first chain. Shown here with the wool needle: 

Make sure that you insert the hook underneath both ‘legs’ of the “v-shape”! 
(Yes, that’s right, this is fiddly work...)

 

  • Got it! You’ll now close the circle with a slip stitch. Wrap the yarn, anti-clockwise, around the hook. 

Make sure that you have the right thread! You need the one attached to the ball, not the loose thread. 

 

  • Crocheting the slip stitch: Step (1) you just did that. Step (2): Carefully pull the yarn through the chain stitch:

Pull carefully to tighten somewhat.

 

  • There are now 2 loops on your hook. The new loop on the left (N), chain nr 6 from the base chain on the right. 
  • Pull the new loop (the left one) also through the base chain 6 (the right one):

 

  • Voilà, you have made a wee little circle: 

 

From now on, the slip stitch is used to close each row. That will be much easier than this first round, though!

 

Row I

Tip: Take the loose thread along when crocheting the first round of trebles. You do this by crocheting the trebles around the thread, as it were. Stick the hook into the circle, put in the loose thread at the back, and treble as usual.

The advantage is that, once you’ve finished Row 1, you can pull on this loose thread and tighten the circle beautifully.

Too complicated? Then just let that loose thread be!

 

  • Chain 2.
  • Now it’s time for trebles. Insert your hook into the opening/middle of the circle (so not into a stitch). Show here with the wool needle: 

 

Now follows a photo-tutorial on how to treble into a circle. It’s the same treble as explained in Chapter II, only now you work into a circle instead of a base chain.

  • Wrap the yarn, anti-clockwise, around the hook. 
  • Insert the hook into the opening in the middle of the circle, shown here with the wool needle: 

 

  • Again wrap the yarn, anti-clockwise, around the hook. You do this at the ‘back’ of the circle: step (1).
  • Pull the yarn through the circle: step (2).

 

  • Again wrap the yarn, anti-clockwise, around the hook. It should now look like this:

 

  • Pull the yarn through the 2 loops on the left:

 

  • There are now 2 loops on the hook. Again wrap the yarn, anti-clockwise, around the hook:

 

  • Pull the yarn through the 2 loops:

 

Congratulations! You have trebled a stitch!

  • There is now only 1 loop left on the hook again:  

 

  • Work another 10 trebles into the opening of the circle.
  • Now you have a tiny circle of 11 trebles in total, plus 2 chains: 

Can you recognise the stitches? 
The 2 chain stitches are at the top (shown with 2 ovals) and are probably somewhat hidden behind the treble stitches.

 

Row 2

  • Chain 2.
  • Wrap the yarn around the hook and insert the hook into the “v-shape” directly next to the chains. Shown here with the wool needle.
  • Work a treble stitch into this stitch.

 

For the rest of Row 2, you work 2 treble stitches into 1 stitch:

  • You’ll work 2 trebles into the next stitch (shown here with the wool needle).
  • Treble 1 into this stitch. Again check that you hook underneath the entire “v-shape”. 
  • Work another treble into this same stitch. 

 

  • It should now look like this:

Can you recognise the stitches?
From right to left: 2 chains, 1 treble, 2 trebles. 
The last 2 trebles are both worked into one underlying stitch. 

 

  • Work 2 trebles into each next stitch.
  • The very last stitch is found at the base of the 2 chains, show here with the wool needle: 

 

  • In this stitch, also work 2 trebles.
  • Close the circle with a slip stitch: insert hook underneath the 2nd chain, wrap yarn, pull yarn through chain and loop on hook. 

 

You have now made a circle of 23 trebles plus 2 chains. When counting chains at the start of a row, these are usually counted as a treble. So you have doubled your circle, from 12 to 24 “trebles”. 

 

Row 3

  • Again, chain 2 to start.
  • Wrap the yarn around the hook, insert hook into the “v-shape” directly next to the chains. (Shown here with the wool needle.) Treble 1 into this stitch.

 

For the rest of Row 3, you alternate between trebling 1 and trebling 2.

  • Wrap the yarn, anti-clockwise, around the hook. Treble into the next stitch. 

Don't forget to make sure that you’ve got the whole “v-shape”. 

 

  • Now treble 2 into the next stitch. It should now look like this:

 

  • Can you recognise the stitches? From right to left: 2 chains, 1 treble, 1 treble, 2 trebles:

 

  • Treble 1 into the next stitch.
  • Treble 2 into the stitch after that.
  • And again treble 1, treble 2.
  • And so on.

 

  • Work around the entire circle this way. 
  • Continue until you have 2 stitches left. Your last worked stitch is a ‘single’ treble.
  • If everything went OK, it should now look like this:

 

  • Treble 2 into the next stitch.
  • Treble 1 into the very last stitch (at the base of the chains).

 

  • Again close the circle with a slip stitch

 

Row 4

  • As usual, chain 2 at the start of Row 4.
  • Then, also as usual, treble 1 into the stitch directly next to the chains.

Do this at the start of each row. 

 

For the rest of Row 4 you repeat treble 1, again treble 1, and then treble 2.

  • Treble 1 into the next stitch. 
  • Again treble 1 into the stitch next to that. 
  • Now treble 2 into the stitch next to that. 

 

  • Can you recognise the stitches? From right to left: 2 chains, 1 treble, 1 treble, 1 treble, 2 trebles.

Do you remember the very first treble at the start of the row? That’s why there are 3 ‘single trebles’ here.

 

The pattern for Row 4 is a repeating sequence of the following:

  • Treble 1, again treble 1, then treble 2
  • Again treble 1, again treble 1, then treble 2
  • And so on.

 

  • Work around Row 4 according to this pattern. Continue until there are 3 stitches left to do. It should now look like this:

Do you recognise the last worked stitches: 2 trebles, 1 treble, 1 treble?

 

  • Work 2 trebles into the next stitch.
  • Work 1 treble into the next stitch.
  • Work 1 treble into the very last stich, at the base of the chains.

 

  • Again close the circle with a slip stitch.

The patch will probably start to round a bit already.

This is a good thing, the crocheted circle will fit the pillow stuffing nicely. 

 

Row 5 

You have probably noticed it already... each new row adds another ‘single’ treble to the sequence. 

  • As usual you start by chaining 2.
  • Next, you treble 1 into the stitch directly next to the chains. Do this each row

Only after this, the pattern of the repeating sequence begins!

Please note!
You start each row with chain 2, treble 1. After that the pattern of the repeating sequence begins!

So at the start of Row 5 you chain 2, then work 4 ‘single’ trebles, then work 2 trebles into one stitch. After that you can repeat the pattern. 

The pattern for Row 5 is a repeating: treble 1, again treble 1, again treble 1, then treble 2. Treble 1, again treble 1, again treble 1, then treble 2. And so on.

  • Repeat: 3 x 1 treble, 1 x 2 trebles, 3 x 1 treble, 1 x 2 trebles, etc. 

 

Row 6 and onwards

Each new row adds another ‘single’ treble to the pattern. 

Start each row with chain 2, treble 1.

Close each row with a slip stitch.

Pattern Row 6: treble 4 x 1, treble 1 x 2, treble 4 x 1, treble 1 x 2 , etc.

Pattern Row 7: treble 5 x 1, treble 1 x 2, treble 5 x 1, treble 1 x 2, etc.

Pattern Row 8: treble 6 x 1, treble 1 x 2, treble 6 x 1, treble 1 x 2, etc.

And so on...

Remember: 

Start each row with chain 2, treble 1, before you start the pattern.

Each new row has an extra ‘single’ treble stitch in the sequence compared to the previous row. 

 

If you like, refer to Chapter I for an overview of how the pattern develops.

 

Pay attention!
... not to crochet on regardless! Close each row with a slip stitch. 
As your patch grows bigger, you could be happily crocheting along, right past the end of the row without noticing. If that happens, you’ll have to pull out up to that point, before you can continue. So make sure to close each row with a slip stitch.

 

Continue until you have crocheted approx. 17 rows, or until the circle fits snugly over one half of the pillow stuffing. 

  • After the last stich, pull a bit on the loop which is still on your hook to make it a bit bigger and take out the hook.
  • Pull the yarn through the loop and pull gently.
  • Do NOT cut off the remaining yarn! Let it be for now.

Make another round patch in the same way, using your second ball of MoYa.

When finished with the second patch, leave the crochet hook in the very last loop. This way you can move right on to crocheting the two patches together. 

 

Chapter IV

FINISHING

Now it’s time to magic the two round patches into a cushion. 

Right side / wrong side. 

Ultimately, you are the one to choose which side of your work you like best.

Usually, what’s considered the wrong side is the side where the remaining thread from casting on is attached. (You can leave this thread be, or wiggle it to the other side in case you prefer the “wrong” side.) 

Weaving in the remaining yarn

On both patches, there’s a piece of yarn left where you finished crocheting. Use one of these threads (preferably the longest one) to crochet the patches together.

Cut off the other thread at approx. 10 cm and weave this into the stitches on the wrong side. 

Fastening the patches together.

To crochet the patches together, you can use various types of stitches. You could even decide to use a different colour, or make the edge into a decoration that is a piece of art in itself. 

Easiest and quickest way though, is the slip stitch. 

Normally you insert the hook underneath the entire “v-shape” of the stitch. Not now.

  • Put one patch on top of the other, with the wrong sides together. The right sides are on the outside.
  • Insert the hook into the stitch (into the “v-shape” instead of underneath) of the lower patch and then into the stitch of the upper patch:

 

  • Wrap the yarn around the hook and pull the hook through the 3 loops:

 

Once you’ve fastened about half (or a bit more) of the patches, put in the stuffing and continue.

After the last stich, pull a bit on the loop which is still on your hook to make it a bit bigger and take out the hook.

Pull the yarn through the loop and pull gently. Cut off the yarn at approx. 10 cm and weave it into the stitches, using the wool needle. 

CONGRATULATIONS! Your cushion is done and ready to use!

 

Did you enjoy this? I sure hope you did! 

Did you enjoy this? I'll dance a jig!

Do you have suggestions? I'd love to hear them.

Are you unhappy? I'll fix it!

So how about you leave me a message in our online guestbook? Of course you can also share your thoughts via hallo @ yarnz . nl  

I’d love to hear from you!

 

 

 

 

Michèle Tewes.

Yarnz. Start Crafting.

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